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01992 500 455
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The Right Track Nursery,
Hertford East Station,
Mill Road, Hertford, Hertfordshire SG14 1SB

Equality of opportunity

Achieving positive behaviour

Policy statement

The right track believes that children flourish best when their personal, social and emotional needs are met and where there are clear and developmentally appropriate expectations for their behaviour.

Children need to learn to consider the views and feelings, needs and rights, of others and the impact that their behaviour has on people, places and objects. This is a developmental task that requires support, encouragement, teaching and setting the correct example. The principles that underpin how we achieve positive and considerate behaviour exist within the programme for promoting personal, social and emotional development.

EYFS key themes and commitments

A Unique Child
1.1 Child development
1.2 Inclusive practice
1.3 Keeping safe

Positive Relationships
2.2 Parents as partners
2.3 Supporting learning

Enabling Environments
3.2 Supporting every child
3.3 The learning environment

Learning and Development
4.4 Personal, social and emotional development


Procedures

We have a named person who has overall responsibility for our programme for supporting personal, social and emotional development, including issues concerning behaviour.

Our named person is: Karen Baker nursery deputy

Strategies with children who engage in inconsiderate behaviour

Children under three years

Rough and tumble play, hurtful behaviour and bullying

Rough and tumble play and fantasy aggression

Young children often engage in play that has aggressive themes such as superhero and weapon play; some children appear pre-occupied with these themes, but their behaviour is not necessarily a precursor to hurtful behaviour or bullying, although it may be inconsiderate at times and may need addressing using strategies as above.

Hurtful behaviour

We take hurtful behaviour very seriously. Most children under the age of five will at some stage hurt or say something hurtful to another child, especially if their emotions are high at the time, but it is not helpful to label this behaviour as 'bullying'. For children under five, hurtful behaviour is momentary, spontaneous and often without cognisance of the feelings of the person whom they have hurt.

Bullying

We take bullying very seriously. Bullying involves the persistent physical or verbal abuse of another child or children. It is characterised by intent to hurt, often planned, and accompanied by an awareness of the impact of the bullying behaviour.

A child who is bullying has reached a stage of cognitive development where he or she is able to plan to carry out a premeditated intent to cause distress in another.

Bullying can occur in children five years old and over and may well be an issue in after school clubs and holiday schemes catering for slightly older children.

If a child bullies another child or children: